A fascinating conversation about NAR/DOJ…

I really want to thank the industry titans who participated in today’s podcast:

As well as all the people who listened in and provided wonderful chat commentary throughout the podcast. There were so many great names that showed up that I can’t wait to get many of you on future podcasts!

I thought if I gave us a half-hour we’d be able to cover the subject completely… but with the crew above, we were flying along after an about an hour when I decided to pull the plug in order to save some energy for next week! 😉

And if you missed the live call, don’t worry, you can still catch all the recored action here:

That was so much fun, I know we’ll do that again… Hopefully soon! 😉

Published by

Dustin Luther

Current lead up the team managing Brand and Influencer Engagement programs for Dun & Bradstreet. You can find me on Twitter (@tyr) or LinkedIn (DustinLuther)

7 thoughts on “A fascinating conversation about NAR/DOJ…”

  1. That was fabulous. Thanks for “hosting” Dustin, and thanks to Mike, Michael, Bill and Jeff.

    I can probably count on the number of 51 minute podcasts I’ve listened to on one hand. I listened to every word of this one.

  2. Great podcast Dustin. A really interesting conversation. I look forward to the next one.

    I would add to the discussion about the settlement and my post tying in to Zillow.
    http://tinyurl.com/3v6p3x

    The settlement does not apply to Zillow since it is not a VOW. My point was, from a legal standpoint, that there are certain seller rights with respect to display and advertising of their home for sale on the internet. Some were specifically mentioned in the settlement –the seller right to hide home address, disable AVM (and link) and disable comments, and the withholding a listing completely from the internet. I call it the right not to participate in the participatory web– a web 2.opt-out

    IMO, this clear language provides a legal basis for a homeowner to challenge Zillow allowing 3rd parties to list a home for sale post a price & allow comments about a home without the owner’s knowledge or permission (and not requiring an owner to “claim” a home to prevent it).

    There have been rumblings in the Z discussion forum where homeowners have wanted an opt-out of misleading zestimates & the home listed on zillow. I think we are close to seeing a lawsuit to make clear just how far an internet website can go without homeowner consent. (I am not talking about public data)

    As you know, I have long argued for homeowner rights and Zillow’s failure to acknowledge them.

    Keep up your contributions to the industry, Dustin.

  3. It is a good idea to put those four guys together to discuss this topic. I read several articles in major newspapers about the agreement, but I became more confused after each article. This conversation did a good job of clearing things up and also provided good commentary on other related topics. These guys know what they are talking about. Dustin, thanks for getting the conversation together. I hope you will do more podcasts soon.

  4. Thanks Brian! I think I jotted myself about 10 different ideas for topics yesterday, so it should be long before I get another one going! It was too much fun!

Leave a Reply