Have trouble understanding Facebook’s privacy settings?

Apparently, even the former marketing director at Facebook (and sister of Mark Zuckerberg) gets blindsided by Facebook’s privacy settings from time to time.

Update: My favorite take on this story yet: Yes, Randi Zuckerberg, Please Lecture Us About `Human Decency’ and if you’re curious about the details of Facebook privacy settings, Marketingland has a nice write up on the details: How Facebook Tagging Helped Make Randi Zuckerberg’s “Private” Photo Go Public

Photos from my CredLIVE trip to DC

I’m just finishing up a great trip to Washington DC where I came out to manage the production of a CredibiltyLIVE event with the President and CEO of the Better Business Bureau.

Since I mentioned how much I enjoy taking and editing photos with my iPhone 4S in my last blog post, I thought I’d share some of my favorites from this trip.

U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial
U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial
Lincoln Memorial
"In this temple as in the hearts of the people for whom he saved the union the memory of Abraham Lincoln is enshrined forever"
Lincoln's Stare
Lincoln
Lincoln Memorial
Lincoln Memorial
Behind the Scenes with the AP Video Production team
Behind the Scenes with the AP Video Production team
Hutch Hutchison & Steve Cox on CredLIVE
Hutch Hutchison & Steve Cox on CredLIVE
Washington Monument
Washington Monument #1
Washington Monument #2
Washington Monument #2
Smithsonian Castle
Smithsonian Castle
White House
White House

I’m totally missing the buzz… I’ve b…

I’m totally missing the buzz…

I’ve been playing with Google Buzz for a few days now and I know I must be missing something *big* because the ONLY thing I’ve found interesting about it so far is that by connecting with a bunch more people on the google platform, I now get more articles showing up in my Google Reader.

Others talk about how it is vindication that email is the social network, but I’m finding my experience much closer to Fred’s that we can’t assume implicit and explicit social networks are one-and-the-same.

The whole service feels really kludgy and doesn’t pass the would-my-family-use-this-tool test… and if they did, they certainly wouldn’t use it to share personal stories, organize events, upload photos, etc, like they do now. My gut tells me it has potential to be a popular tool among the tech-crowd along the lines of twitter thanks to slick mobile integration, geolocation features, etc., but it’s missing way too many of Facebook’s “connecting” features like photos sharing/tagging, video sharing/tagging, groups, etc., for it to really be a mass-appeal social network.

However, with that said, David Gibbons obviously has a different take. He tweets:

@tyr a) not a walled garden b) nothing cutsie about it c) smart conversation notification d) local integration is AWESOME #whyBUZZisbetter”

and

@tyr it’s far from perfect but they’re iterating at light speed & what really matters is the (sociological) foundation which kicks fb’s butt”

so I’m worried I must be missing something big. Help me out.

How is Google Buzz going to challenge Facebook in any meaningful way?

UPDATE 1

Appropriate to the topic, there has been a decent conversation about this topic on a google buzz thread.

UPDATE 2

Robert Scoble sums up my thoughts well: Why did Google copy FriendFeed’s worst features?

How to use Flickr photos in a blog post

I just got question in an email from a real estate agent, and I figured my answer could probably help ore than a few people.

“I have been on Flickr and found some great photos from my area.  How do I know if these pictures are the ‘creative customs’ license?  Can I just use them?

From what I’ve seen work in practice, there are two good options to know if you can use a Flickr photo in your blog post:

  1. Someone has uploaded and licensed their photo on Flickr under a creative commons license.
  2. Someone on Flickr has allowed other members to “blog” their photo, which works regardless of the license they set for the photo.

Here’s how to work each option:

Option #1:
On the bottom right panel on the page of any photo, there is a section that describes the “permissions” for the photo. If something is creative commons, then the text will say “some rights reserved” and links to a creative commons license.  These are photos you can use as long as you give attribution back to the photographer by providing a link to the Flickr page with the photo.

If it is *not* creative commons then it will say “All Right Reserved”, and you should avoid using these photos on your blog.

Here’s an example of a photo that uses a creative commons license, and here is an example of a photo where all the rights are reserved.

Also, Flickr makes it easy to search ONLY creative common licensed photos by using their advanced search and checking the boxes at the bottom of the page.

Option #2:
If you are logged in to the service (and only if you’re logged in), then Flickr makes it easy to tell if someone won’t mind if you blog their photos.  All you have to look for is the text above the photo that says “blog this”.  If someone include the “blog this” button above the photo, then it means they’ve agreed to let any Flickr member use their photo in a blog post, regardless of the license they put on the photo.   Here’s an example of that type of button:

And here is what a photo will look like if you use Flickr’s “blog this” tools:


Grin., originally uploaded by :. G l o r i a .:.
Hope that helps!

I added a stream of the latest flickr photos from the RE.net group…

photos from the RE.net group on Flickr

…to my sidepanel a few weeks ago and it seems to really have picked up steam lately… Lots of new photos showing up every day!   It’s actually a lot of fun to see the stream of new photos on a regular basis!   If you have photos of the people, places and events of online real estate, then definitely join the RE.net group and submit your photos as well!

Zillow gives us some remodeling porn, and…

… surprise, surprise, it’s fun!

The idea is that they provide two photos of different rooms (or areas) of a house, and you get to vote on which one is better.  The process is simple… View, vote and repeat.   Getting the hang of the site only takes a few moments and it shockingly addictive.

Another feature is that you can sort rooms that rank high (kitchens, for example), which could provide some interesting remodeling and staging ideas.

Play around for a bit and one thing that will stick out is the poor quality of many of the photos.   If you’re anything like me, then you’ll likely find yourself not voting for a room because the photo is out of focus, the angle is bad or the lighting is inadequate.   I doubt it will be news to anyone reading this blog, but good photos are important and Zillow’s Dueling Digs does a great job demonstrating the benefits of great photography.

(h/t Spencer)